Condiciones en el área de trabajo

Super mega tiendas las cuales se proyectan al mundo de ser las mejores tanto para sus empleados como para los clientes. Enfatizan la garantía de tener los mejores productos, los “mejores líderes “.

Estos “líderes ” deben de tomar alguna clase de mejor trato a sus empleados,  al cliente como tal. Deben ejercer su trabajo de la manera adecuada y no ser solo puestos vacíos,  puestos votados.


Adornan con mero orgullo una tienda profesando y enfatizando la seguridad, como han dicho, “ustedes los asociados son los assets mas importantes “. 


Pero de repente nos topamos con estas cosas.


También tenemos estos ejemplares de la comedia divina que hacen alguna mofa de asociados que hayan tenido algún accidente en el área de trabajo u otros que se preocupan por alguna pérdida que pueda incurrir la tienda.

Si, tremendos líderes….

Advertisements

Séptimo testimonio

Una asociada que lleva varios años en la tienda comenta con molestia la falta de profesionalismo y el cambio que ha dado el Gerente de la tienda 2501:

“No se que le ha pasado a nuestro Gerente, el ha dado un cambio del cielo a la tierra. Tanto que nos dice que de tener alguna queja o alguna situación que lo paremos y se lo digamos. Se ha hecho, bueno yo lo he hecho, pero me asombró lo que le escuché decir que el prefería irse a la oficina que está por auto porque así no lo molestaban, que estaba cansado ya de escuchar tanta queja. Que vamos hacer con un Gerente que no se preocupa por los suyos, esto es bien lamentable”.

Concluye la asociada. En mi opinión personal este “líder”, el cual tiene una organización de como desarrollar profesionales,  siempre ha sido el mismo,  para mi es una mala persona. Usa un disfraz que lo hace ver al público y hasta algunos asociados como tremendo “líder”, lo cual no lo es. Solo tiene la posición,  Gerente de tienda, más nada.

Laoch6

Work conditions

It seems incredible that a company that has a solid economic income ignore these conditions. Our “leaders” emphasize that safety and then seems that doesn’t care.

image

image

We return in this area that often associates should seek merchandise,  most of the time is blocked due to the deterioration and many of these areas makes it a little difficult to be able to complete the task.

image

image

image

image

The deterioration that reflects on the photos represent the lack of authority , poor performance from the suervisor . They talk about the decline and these ” leaders” are the first to ignore this, that if, at meetings do not flinch to blame . It’s disappointing.

Laoch6

The Ugly Walmart Truth: Some Managers Treat Workers Like Dirt

A manager comes forward to reveal the corporation’s abusive culture and the way it retaliates against workers organizing for change.

Low wages, no benefits, irregular schedules, and unreliable hours are just some of the horrible working conditions most Walmart workers have to endure. Yet when I asked some of the workers what they consider the worst part about working for the corporation, they didn’t mention any of these wretched labor practices. Instead, they all gave the same answer: disrespectful managers.

These managers have committed offenses big and small. Some have refused to return a “hello” from their workers. Others have forced workers to do heavy-duty work despite medical conditions and pregnancies. And worse, one manager even told an African-American worker that “he’d like to put [a] rope around his neck.”

When workers try to better their working conditions through OUR Walmart, a community of current and former workers, managers’ behavior often gets worse. A manager was even recorded telling workers he “wanted to shoot everyone” organizing for change.
LABOR

The Ugly Walmart Truth: Some Managers Treat Workers Like Dirt

A manager comes forward to reveal the corporation’s abusive culture and the way it retaliates against workers organizing for change.

By Alyssa Figueroa / AlterNet

January 29, 2015

Print

183 COMMENTS

Photo Credit: Alyssa Figueroa

Low wages, no benefits, irregular schedules, and unreliable hours are just some of the horrible working conditions most Walmart workers have to endure. Yet when I asked some of the workers what they consider the worst part about working for the corporation, they didn’t mention any of these wretched labor practices. Instead, they all gave the same answer: disrespectful managers.

These managers have committed offenses big and small. Some have refused to return a “hello” from their workers. Others have forced workers to do heavy-duty work despite medical conditions and pregnancies. And worse, one manager even told an African-American worker that “he’d like to put [a] rope around his neck.”

When workers try to better their working conditions through OUR Walmart, a community of current and former workers, managers’ behavior often gets worse. A manager was even recorded telling workers he “wanted to shoot everyone” organizing for change.

This leads to one of two conclusions. Either Walmart is eerily talented at hiring the meanest bullies on earth, or there is something about the corporation’s culture that manipulates its managers into treating workers in a subhuman fashion. After reading leaked documents that exposed the way Walmart trains its managers on how to deal with OUR Walmart workers (hint: by misinforming and tattling on them), I developed a hunch it was the latter. Then “Dan,” an assistant manager for a Walmart store in the Midwest, confirmed my intuition.

I spoke with Dan (a pseudonym) under the condition of anonymity. (Managers are not protected under the same federal labor laws as other workers.) Well-spoken, polite and admirably humble, Dan has been a manager at Walmart for several years and said the warped corporate culture comes down to how Walmart views its workers.

“We don’t treat people with respect,” Dan said. “The stigma within a Walmart facility, and even some of the really good ones, is still, ‘We need bodies.’ But, we’re human beings, we’re not bodies.” 

That outlook—that workers are just cogs in a massive capitalist machine—drives Walmart to give workers often unfeasible workloads created to squeeze out every drop of their labor. And managers are responsible for making sure these workloads are completed.

“Even when we talk about the facts, the figures, the data—even our own company programs that are used to assess how much a workload is—whenever the numbers don’t match up, we’re still expected to get everything done 100 percent,” Dan said. “And as managers, we’re expected to stay, to the point where I’ve worked 14-or 16-hour days on a regular basis.”

Faced with this extreme pressure, managers often pass their anxiety on to workers.

“Walmart has forced managers into bad positions because we’re overworked and overstressed and not handling it the best way we should and sometimes we take it out on associates,” Dan said.

Dan admits he’s not perfect and has occasionally snapped at workers. He tries to direct his frustrations to upper-management, but ultimately, they give him unusable advice instead of practical strategies for managing his staff’s workload.

“They say, you’re managers. I pay you to solve problems, and if you can’t solve the problem, I need to pay someone else to do it.”

Dan said the higher-ups harass him on a constant basis about not working hard enough. As some form of protection, Dan began keeping notes on his workload, the amount of workers needed to complete it, and the standard company time it takes to get done. That way, when he’s told he hasn’t done his job, Dan can say, “Show me the data.” His supervisors can’t. This is also why Dan has not faced administrative action for his supposedly poor performance. But he is punished in other ways.

“I say, you can’t tell me based on these facts and based on this math that I didn’t do my job for the evening,” Dan said. “But they still will. And they’re designed to keep it verbal and they’re designed to make it personal. Because of the frustration I feel constantly being told I’m not performing, I’m not good enough, I don’t want my associates to feel that way when I know they’re performing.”

But many managers do make their workers feel that way. So what separates the respectful and the disrespectful managers at Walmart?

“It’s whether or not you drink Walmart’s Kool-Aid,” Dan said. “If you do, you’re going to go on with the solidarity. I don’t know how many meetings that I’ve been to that they say, whether we agree or disagree at the end of this meeting we are one team and we will have one direction. Deviation will not be tolerated. It’s also the fear of losing your job or the fear of administrative action controls you.”

It doesn’t help that Walmart incentivizes this by-any-means-necessary behavior.

“Unfortunately, we sometimes reward people who aren’t the best managers because they are getting things done,” Dan said. “But they’re getting things done because they’re trampling over the people below them and grinding them into the ground. So they are getting some results, but not getting results the right way and those results are not lasting.”

What this often means for workers is constant harassment and degradation from management. Dan told me about a recent situation where a manager he works with was hounding one of their workers, nearly screaming at him, because they were far behind on unloading a truck. The worker, who consistently performs at a high level, couldn’t understand why he was behind either.

“He said, I don’t know why I’m a failure today,” Dan said. “Now this is a grown adult really on the verge of being in tears, and I’m like, that’s not appropriate.”

Dan managed to calm the other manager down and figured out that they were unloading the wrong truck. Instead of being behind, they were actually far ahead.

Belittling workers like this is no way to run a business, Dan said.

“You can only hold power for so long before either the fear holds no more power or rebellion sets in.”
Dan has already reached that point.

“I’ve gotten to a point where fear no longer runs my life, but there was a point in my career when it was,” Dan said. “At one point, I didn’t take a day off for 12 days, and that’s working 14-hour days. That’s how much I let the pressure get to me. And that does a lot of other things to a person. It has personally messed up a lot of things in my life. My last marriage kinda ended over the amount of work I was putting into my job.”

Walmart workers have had enough, too. That’s why some are organizing with OUR Walmart for better working conditions. But the corporation is also organizing. It has developed a plan to deal with OUR Walmart and has trained managers to carry it out. Some of these training documents were leaked early last year. Dan confirmed the documents’ statements on Walmart’s official response to workers’ organizing.

“If an associate asks about OUR Walmart, they tell you to call their Labor Relations Hotline and say to the associate, ‘They’re like a union. I don’t think we really need a union. We’re pro-associate, not anti-union’ and ‘You’re going to pay your hard earned money to someone to speak for you when you can speak for yourself.'” (OUR Walmart has an optional $5 monthly dues.)

Unofficially, the higher-ups at Walmart are also telling managers to hamper the movement.

“We were told on a conference call, ‘We don’t want this OUR Walmart movement, and you are directly responsible for whether they show up. If you’re thinking it’s going to come in, you got to start looking at the individuals who are bringing the influence in and figure out what’s going on,’” Dan said.

Sometimes, that means actually trying to solve workers’ concerns. But other times, that means managers are supposed to pay special attention to people who may be members of OUR Walmart.

Dan said one of his general managers was so paranoid he made his managers call him immediately if they heard a worker speak about OUR Walmart and provide documentation of every worker that employee was in contact with each day.

Managers are also encouraged to be particularly mindful of these employees’ work performances. Dan said sometimes managers will chastise workers they think are with OUR Walmart for trivial matters, like resting for a few extra minutes during a break.

“That comes up more often if that worker is identifying themselves as an OUR Walmart associate or are interested in it because there’s no way for us to really know if they’re an OUR Walmart associate,” Dan said. “But if we can suspect them, we can start the data trail in case something goes wrong.”

Dan recently contacted OUR Walmart hoping that, as a manager, they would let him join. He became a member last week. 

“I support OUR Walmart. And I came to that decision when I reached the point where I wanted to do anything I can to help associates not feel the same way I do when I’m at work and not feel the way I feel about myself in their job.”

Dan said he hopes associates remember that managers are people, too.

“Your boss may be just as miserable as you are,” Dan said. “And they may not have the answer on how to fix things, and we don’t always agree with what’s going on. I would hope more associates would recognize that in managers and more managers will come out and say ‘Look, I agree this is wrong. I want to do what I can to help my associates.’ I would rather bridge this gap than create more of a friction.”

image

Laoch6

La Fea Verdad de Walamrt: Algunos gerentes tratan a los trabajadores de manera denigrante

Un gerente habla y revela la cultura abusiva de la corporación y de la forma en que toma represalias contra los trabajadores que se organizan para el cambio.

By Alyssa Figueroa/Alternet

Los bajos salarios, falta de beneficios, horarios irregulares y horas que carecen de confianza son sólo algunas de las condiciones de trabajo que la mayoría de los trabajadores de Walmart tienen que soportar . Sin embargo, cuando le pregunté a algunos de los trabajadores lo que ellos consideran la peor parte de trabajar para la corporación , no mencionaron ninguna de estas prácticas laborales miserables . En su lugar , todos ellos dieron la misma respuesta: gerentes irrespetuosos.

Estos gerentes han cometido delitos grandes y pequeños. Algunos carecen de una falta de cordialidad como devolver un ” hola ” asus trabajadores. Otros han obligado a los trabajadores hacer el trabajo de servicio pesado a pesar de las condiciones médicas y los embarazos . Y peor aún, un gerente incluso le dijo a un trabajador afroamericano que ” le gustaría poner [ a] la cuerda alrededor de su cuello . “

Cuando los trabajadores tratan de mejorar sus condiciones de trabajo a través de OurWalmart , una comunidad de trabajadores actuales y anteriores , el comportamiento de los directivos a menudo empeora . Un gerente fue incluso grabado diciendo a los trabajadores que ” quería disparar a todos” los que se estaban organizando  para el cambio.

Esto conduce a una de dos conclusiones. Walmart es talentoso en la contratación de gerentes abusadores, o hay algo acerca de la cultura de la corporación que manipula sus gerentes en el tratamiento de los trabajadores de manera infrahumana. Después de leer documentos filtrados que expusieron la forma en que Walmart capacita a sus gerentes sobre cómo tratar con trabajadores de OurWalmart (pista: desinformar y perseguirlos), he desarrollado una corazonada que era el último. A continuación, “Dan”, un asistente de gerente de una tienda Wal-Mart en el Medio Oeste, confirmó mi intuición.

Hablé con Dan (un seudónimo), bajo la condición de anonimato. (Los gerentes no están protegidos por las mismas leyes laborales federales que los demás trabajadores.) Bien hablado, educado y admirablemente humilde, Dan ha sido gerente en Walmart durante varios años y dijo que la cultura corporativa se reduce a cómo esta ve a sus trabajadores.

“Nosotros no tratamos a la gente con respeto”, dijo Dan. “El estigma dentro de una instalación de Walmart, e incluso algunos de los realmente buenos, sigue siendo, ‘Necesitamos cuerpos.’ Pero nosotros somos seres humanos, no cuerpos.

Esa perspectiva , los trabajadores son lo que se podría decir, engranajes de la masiva máquina capitalista de Walmart para dar a los trabajadores a menudo cargas de trabajo excesas con el motivo de exprimir hasta la última gota de su trabajo. Y los gerentes son responsables de asegurarse de que estas cargas de trabajo se han completado.

“Incluso cuando hablamos de los hechos , las cifras , los datos incluso nuestros propios programas de la compañía que se utilizan para evaluar la cantidad de una carga de trabajo aunque los números no coincidan , esperamos  obtener todo hecho 100 ciento “ , dijo Dan . ” Y como gerentes muchas veces se nos requiere quedarse laborando  14 o 16 horas día sobre”.

Ante esta presión extrema , los gerentes a menudo pasan su ansiedad a los trabajadores.

“Walmart ha obligado a los gerentes a estar en malas posiciones porque estamos sobrecargados de trabajo y estrenados, al no  manejarlo de la mejor manera que deberíamos muchas veces se desquita con los asociados “, dijo Dan .

Dan admite que no es perfecto y se ha comportado negativamente de vez en cuando con los trabajadores . Trata de dirigir sus frustraciones a una autoridad mas grande en la compañía, pero últimamente le dan consejos ineficientes en lugar de estrategias prácticas para la gestión de la carga de trabajo de su personal .

“Ellos dicen , eres gerente. Se te paga para resolver problemas, y si no se puede resolver el problema , tengo que buscar a alguien para hacerlo. “

Dan dijo que los altos mandos le acosan de manera constante por no trabajar lo suficiente . Como algún tipo de protección , Dan comenzó a llevar notas de su carga de trabajo , la cantidad de trabajadores necesarios para su realización , y el tiempo estándar de la compañía que se necesita para completar las tareas. De esa manera , cuando se le dice que él no ha hecho su trabajo , Dan puede decir: “Muéstrame los datos. ” Sus supervisores no pueden. Esta es también la razón por la que Dan no se le ha penalizado con una acción administrativa por su supuesto bajo rendimiento . Pero él es castigado de otras maneras.

Digo , no me puedes decir sobre la base de estos hechos y con base en esto de matemáticas que no hice mi trabajo por la noche “, dice Dan . ” Pero todavía lo hacen. Y están diseñados para mantenerlo verbal y que para hacerlo personal . Debido a la frustración que constantemente siento que me digan que no estoy realizando mi trabajo, que  no soy lo suficientemente bueno, no quiero que mis asociados se sientan de esa manera cuando sé que están realizando su trababo. “

Pero muchos gerentes hacen que sus trabajadores se sienten de esa manera. Así que es lo que separa el respeto y los gerentes irrespetuosos en Walmart ?

” Se trata de si o no usted bebe del Walmart Kool-Aid “, dijo Dan . ” Si lo haces, vas a seguir con la solidaridad. No sé cuántas reuniones en que he estado se suele decir, si estamos de acuerdo o no al final de esta reunión somos un equipo y vamos a tener una dirección. La desviación no será tolerada . Es también el miedo a perder su trabajo o el miedo de la manipulación administrativa hacia uno.”

” Por desgracia , a veces no se recompensan a los gerentes verdaderamemte buenos, se led recompensa a los que logran que las cosas se hagan “, dijo Dan . “Están obteniendo que las cosas se hagan porque están pisoteando a los  asociados y colocándolos por debajo de ellos. Así que están obteniendo algunos resultados , pero no obtienen los resultados de la manera correcta y los resultados no son duraderos . ”

Lo que cada asociado percibe a menudo es constante acoso y la degradación de la dirección. Dan me habló de una situación reciente en que un gerente que trabaja con el fue perseguir a uno de sus trabajadores , casi gritándole, porque estaba atrasado en la descarga de un camión. El trabajador, que realiza constantemente un nivel de alto rendimiento, no podía entender por qué estaba atrasado tampoco.

Él dijo , yo no sé por qué estoy atrasado hoy “, dijo Dan . ” Ahora bien, este es un adulto a punto de estar en lágrimas, yo me dije, eso no es apropiado”

Dan logró calmar a su colega de la gerencia y descubrió que estaban descargando el camión equivocado. En lugar de estar atrasado, en realidad estaba muy por delante .

Menospreciar trabajadores como éste no es  manera de manejar un negocio, dijo Dan .

“Sólo se puede mantener el poder durante tanto tiempo antes de que ese miedo se disipe o que se forme una rebelión” .

Dan ya ha llegado a este punto .

” He llegado a un punto en que el miedo ya no funciona en mi vida , pero había un punto en mi carrera en que si lo era “, dijo Dan . ” En un momento dado , no me tomé un día libre durante 12 días, estaba funcionando 14 horas al día . Eso es lo mucho que dejé la presión llegar a mí . Y eso hace un montón de cosas a una persona. Se ha metido personalmente en un montón de cosas de mi vida. Mi último matrimonio terminó por la  cantidad de trabajo que hacía y estaba compartiendo poco con mi familia ” .

Los trabajadores de Walmart han tenido suficiente , también. Es por eso que algunos están organizando con la organización OurWalmart para luchar por mejores condiciones de trabajo. Pero la empresa también se está organizando . Se ha desarrollado un plan para lidiar con  OurWalmart y ha capacitado a los administradores para llevarlo a cabo. Algunos de estos documentos de formación se filtró a principios del año pasado. Dan confirmó ‘ declaraciones sobre la respuesta oficial de Walmart a los trabajadores que se están organizando’.

“Si un asociado le pregunta acerca de OurWalmart, le dicen que llame a su línea directa de Relaciones Laborales y le dicen a la asociada, ‘ Son como un sindicato. No creo que realmente necesitamos un sindicato. Estamos a favor del asociado, no somos antintisindical,  pero, “y” usted va a pagar del  dinero que duramente ha ganado para que alguien hable por usted cuando se puede hablar por sí mismo . “( OUR Walmart tiene una aportación opcional, $5 dólares mensuales.)

Extraoficialmente , las figuras de autoridad más altas en Walmart también están diciendo a los administradores para obstaculizar el movimiento .

Se nos dijo en una conferencia telefónica , ‘ No queremos que este movimiento OurWalmart , y usted es el responsable directo de si aparecen. Si usted está pensando que van a entrar, tienes que empezar a buscar a las personas que están trayendo la influencia y averiguar lo que está pasando ‘”, dijo Dan .

A veces , eso significa que en realidad están  tratando de resolver las preocupaciones de los trabajadores. Pero otras veces, significa que los gerentes deben prestar especial atención a las personas que puedan ser miembros de OurWalmart.

Dan dijo que uno de sus directores generales era tan paranoico que hizo que sus gerentes le llamaran inmediatamente si escucharan a un trabajador de hablar de OurWalmart y proporcionar la documentación de cada asociado que tuvo contacto cada día .

También se anima a los administradores a ser particularmente conscientes de actuaciones de trabajo de estos empleados . Dan dijo que a veces los gerentes castigan a los trabajadores que creen que están con OurWalmart por asuntos triviales , como tomar varios minutos de descanso después de la hora de comida.

” Eso viene más a menudo si ese trabajador se  está identificando a sí mismos como un asociado de OurWalmart o están interesados ​​en , porque no hay manera de que realmente sabemos si son de OurWalmart”, dijo Dan . ” Pero si sospechamos de ellos , podemos iniciar el camino de datos en caso de que algo vaya mal. ”

Dan contactó recientemente a  OurWalmart con la esperanza de que , como gerente, le permitieran unirse. Se convirtió en un miembro.

“Yo apoyo a OurWalmart. Y tomé esa decisión cuando llegué al punto en el que yo quería hacer todo lo que pudiera para ayudar a los asociados para que no se sienten de la misma manera que me pasó cuando estaba en el trabajo y no sentir lo que siento sobre mí en su trabajo ” .

Dan dijo que espera que los asociados recuerden que los gerentes también son personas .

” Tu jefe puede sentirse tan miserable como te sientes “, dijo Dan . ” Y puede que no tengan la respuesta en la forma de arreglar las cosas, y no siempre estoy de acuerdo con lo que está pasando. Yo esperaría que más asociados reconocerían eso en los gerentes y más gerentes salgan y digan : “Mira , estoy de acuerdo que esto está mal . Quiero hacer lo que pueda para ayudar a mis compañeros . ” Prefiero cerrar así que crear descontento” .

image

Laoch6

The Wal-Mart Slayer: How Publix’s People-First Culture Is Winning The Grocer War

By Bryan Solomon
http://www.forbes.com/sites/briansolomon/

image

Family-run Publix is both the largest employee-owned company and the most profitable grocer in America. Those two facts are linked, and they might be the formula for fending off Bentonville’s retail behemoth.

Passing through Publix’s sliding doors to escape the blistering Lakeland, Fla. heat is a welcome relief, but it isn’t just the air-conditioning that jumps out at you. As you walk the aisles, bag boys and clerks in sage-green shirts and black aprons routinely smile and ask questions: “How are you today? Can we help you with anything?”

When a middle-aged woman asks about a box of crackers, no aisle number is blurted out. Instead, an employee races off to find the item, just as he is trained to do. At checkout, shoppers move to the front quickly, thanks to a two-customer-per-line goal enforced by proprietary, predictive staffing software. Baggers, a foggy memory at most large supermarket chains, carry purchases to the parking lot. Even Publix’s president, Todd Jones, who started out as a bagger 33 years ago, stoops down to pick up specks of trash on the store floor.

“We believe that there are three ways to differentiate: service, quality and price,” Jones says. “You’ve got to be good at two of them, and the best at one. We make service our number one, then quality and then price.”

If that’s a dig at Wal-Mart–traditional slogan: “Always low prices”–which has recently targeted Publix’s home turf, Florida, it’s a subtle one. The more direct retort comes via the numbers. As best we can tell, Publix is the most profitable grocery chain in the nation: Its net margins, 5.6% in 2012, trounced Wal-Mart’s (3.8%), as well as those of every public competitor, ranging from mass market Kroger (1.6%) to hoity-toity Whole Foods (3.9%).

Those numbers in a field notorious for razor-thin margins stem from another heady fact: Publix, the seventh-largest private company in the U.S. ($27.5 billion in sales) and one of the least understood thanks to decades of media reticence, is also the largest employee-owned company in America. For 83 years Publix has thrived by delivering top-rated service to its shoppers by turning thousands of its cashiers, baggers, butchers and bakers into the company’s largest collective shareholders. All staffers who have put in 1,000 work hours and a year of employment receive an additional 8.5% of their total pay in the form of Publix stock. (Though private, the board sets the stock price every quarter based on an independent valuation; it’s pegged at $26.90 now, up nearly 20% already this year.) How rich can employees get? According to Publix, a store manager who has worked at the company for 20 years and earns between $100,000 and $130,000 likely has $300,000 in stock and has received another $30,000 in dividends.

The route to that payday is completely transparent. Publix almost exclusively promotes from within, and every store displays advancement charts showing the path each employee can take to become a manager. Fifty-eight thousand of the company’s 159,000 employees have officially registered their interest in advancement. Associates are encouraged to rotate through various divisions, from grocery to real estate to distribution, to get a broad sense of the business. A former cake decorator in a store bakery is now in charge of all strategy for its bakeries. A distribution-center manager overseeing 800 associates got his start unloading railcars. When Lakeland store manager Edd Dean started bagging groceries as a teenager, he never expected to still be working in a supermarket 30 years later. “When I graduated college I had been seven years at Publix, and I started looking for a ‘real job,’” he says. “I interviewed at a lot of companies, but the manager I was working with kept hounding me to come to Publix. Eventually it just clicked.” Dean is one of 34,000 employees who have more than ten years of tenure.

“I’m always amazed that more companies don’t recognize the power of associate ownership,” says Publix CEO Ed Crenshaw, 62, the grandson of founder George Jenkins and the fourth family member to run the company. While Crenshaw has a 1.1% stake in Publix, worth $230 million, and his entire family has 20%, worth $4.2 billion, the employees (and former employees) are the controlling shareholders, with an 80% stake, worth $16.6 billion. Not surprisingly none of them belongs to a union.

Publix has effectively developed a hammerlock in the lucrative Florida market, where its 755 stores (out of 1,073 total) more than double any rival’s. “They have blanketed the state so thoroughly that it has made it difficult for anyone else to make inroads,” says Mark Hamstra, editor of Supermarket News.

That’s now changing. The formidable Wal-Mart is targeting Florida after saturating every other market in the South; it now has 239 locations with grocery departments in the state. Kroger, the nation’s second-largest retailer, with $97 billion in sales, bought upscale grocer Harris Teeter in July, picking up its first store in Florida since pulling out in 1988. It also competes directly with Publix in the Atlanta area–and soon will be with its slew of locations in North Carolina, which Publix plans to enter next year. German discount retailer Aldi has also moved into Florida.

Yet Crenshaw remains unfazed–he has faith in his employees and his complex compensation system that, in addition to ubiquitous ownership, grants shares of a store-specific bonus pool every 13 weeks. The exact amount varies, but typically 20% of quarterly profits go into that larger pool; 20% of the pool is then paid out in cash to the store’s employees. “When competition opens up across the street and our sales are impacted, they’re impacted,” he says. “So they’re incented to make sure they’re doing everything they can to serve that customer to the best of their ability.”

THE TRADITION OF employee ownership dates back to Crenshaw’s grandfather, whose office at Publix’s old headquarters is being restored to its wood-paneled 1960s glory for historical tours. (“It’s our Graceland,” says one assistant store manager.) As the story goes, George Jenkins had been the manager of a successful Piggly Wiggly market in Winter Haven, Fla. but quit at the start of the Great Depression when the new corporate owner, based in Atlanta, refused to grant even five minutes of face time despite Jenkins’ driving eight hours to see him. While forced to wait outside the office, Jenkins supposedly overheard his new boss talking about golf, so he resolved to quit and start a rival store in Winter Haven. From the outset he gave shares in the company to early employees in an effort to win their loyalty.

Jenkins’ big gamble came a decade later. He closed his two stores, borrowed against an orange grove he owned and opened a state-of-the-art supermarket with then new amenities like air-conditioning, wide aisles, automatic doors, fluorescent lighting and a water fountain. People mocked him for pouring money into unnecessary details. But customers loved the in-store comforts, especially the relief from the sweltering Florida sun, and thanked him by spending more on average than they had previously.

 Entrepreneurs

COVER STORYInvestment Guide 2016

Most Popular

New Posts

on The Wal-Mart Slayer: How Publix’s People-First Culture Is Winning The Grocer War

Please log in or sign up to comment.

POST COMMENT

Commenting Guidelines 

+ FOLLOW THE CONVERSATION

Trending Now

JUL 24, 2013 @ 11:58 AM424,859 VIEWSThe Wal-Mart Slayer: How Publix’s People-First Culture Is Winning The Grocer WarCEO Ed Crenshaw: “Publix just might be the best company in the whole world.” Credit: Bob Croslin for Forbes

Brian Solomon

FORBES STAFF 

Covering technology and the on-demand economy.

This story appears in the August 12, 2013 issue of Forbes. Subscribe

Family-run Publix is both the largest employee-owned company and the most profitable grocer in America. Those two facts are linked, and they might be the formula for fending off Bentonville’s retail behemoth.

Passing through Publix’s sliding doors to escape the blistering Lakeland, Fla. heat is a welcome relief, but it isn’t just the air-conditioning that jumps out at you. As you walk the aisles, bag boys and clerks in sage-green shirts and black aprons routinely smile and ask questions: “How are you today? Can we help you with anything?”

“” loaded=”1″ style=”box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: bottom;”>

When a middle-aged woman asks about a box of crackers, no aisle number is blurted out. Instead, an employee races off to find the item, just as he is trained to do. At checkout, shoppers move to the front quickly, thanks to a two-customer-per-line goal enforced by proprietary, predictive staffing software. Baggers, a foggy memory at most large supermarket chains, carry purchases to the parking lot. Even Publix’s president, Todd Jones, who started out as a bagger 33 years ago, stoops down to pick up specks of trash on the store floor.

“We believe that there are three ways to differentiate: service, quality and price,” Jones says. “You’ve got to be good at two of them, and the best at one. We make service our number one, then quality and then price.”

 

PegaVoice

Meet The Newest C-Suite Member: Chief Experience Officer [Video]

If that’s a dig at Wal-Mart–traditional slogan: “Always low prices”–which has recently targeted Publix’s home turf, Florida, it’s a subtle one. The more direct retort comes via the numbers. As best we can tell, Publix is the most profitable grocery chain in the nation: Its net margins, 5.6% in 2012, trounced Wal-Mart’s (3.8%), as well as those of every public competitor, ranging from mass market Kroger (1.6%) to hoity-toity Whole Foods (3.9%).

Those numbers in a field notorious for razor-thin margins stem from another heady fact: Publix, the seventh-largest private company in the U.S. ($27.5 billion in sales) and one of the least understood thanks to decades of media reticence, is also the largest employee-owned company in America. For 83 years Publix has thrived by delivering top-rated service to its shoppers by turning thousands of its cashiers, baggers, butchers and bakers into the company’s largest collective shareholders. All staffers who have put in 1,000 work hours and a year of employment receive an additional 8.5% of their total pay in the form of Publix stock. (Though private, the board sets the stock price every quarter based on an independent valuation; it’s pegged at $26.90 now, up nearly 20% already this year.) How rich can employees get? According to Publix, a store manager who has worked at the company for 20 years and earns between $100,000 and $130,000 likely has $300,000 in stock and has received another $30,000 in dividends.

Recommended by Forbes

MOST POPULAR

Photos: The Richest Person In Every State

The Six Habits Of Successful Private Companies

Supermarket Publix Denies Conservative Claims That Its Mother’s Day Ad Is …

David Green: The Biblical Billionaire Backing The Evangelical Movement

What Paula Deen Must Say To Corporate America To Survive

MOST POPULAR

Photos: 2016 30 Under 30: Retail & E-Commerce

+250,898 VIEWS

iPhone 7 Leaks ‘Confirm’ Apple Abandoning Headphone Jack

MOST POPULAR

Photos: The Richest Person In Every State

The Six Habits Of Successful Private Companies

The route to that payday is completely transparent. Publix almost exclusively promotes from within, and every store displays advancement charts showing the path each employee can take to become a manager. Fifty-eight thousand of the company’s 159,000 employees have officially registered their interest in advancement. Associates are encouraged to rotate through various divisions, from grocery to real estate to distribution, to get a broad sense of the business. A former cake decorator in a store bakery is now in charge of all strategy for its bakeries. A distribution-center manager overseeing 800 associates got his start unloading railcars. When Lakeland store manager Edd Dean started bagging groceries as a teenager, he never expected to still be working in a supermarket 30 years later. “When I graduated college I had been seven years at Publix, and I started looking for a ‘real job,’” he says. “I interviewed at a lot of companies, but the manager I was working with kept hounding me to come to Publix. Eventually it just clicked.” Dean is one of 34,000 employees who have more than ten years of tenure.

“” loaded=”1″ style=”box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: bottom;”>

“I’m always amazed that more companies don’t recognize the power of associate ownership,” says Publix CEO Ed Crenshaw, 62, the grandson of founder George Jenkins and the fourth family member to run the company. While Crenshaw has a 1.1% stake in Publix, worth $230 million, and his entire family has 20%, worth $4.2 billion, the employees (and former employees) are the controlling shareholders, with an 80% stake, worth $16.6 billion. Not surprisingly none of them belongs to a union.

Publix has effectively developed a hammerlock in the lucrative Florida market, where its 755 stores (out of 1,073 total) more than double any rival’s. “They have blanketed the state so thoroughly that it has made it difficult for anyone else to make inroads,” says Mark Hamstra, editor of Supermarket News.

That’s now changing. The formidable Wal-Mart is targeting Florida after saturating every other market in the South; it now has 239 locations with grocery departments in the state. Kroger, the nation’s second-largest retailer, with $97 billion in sales, bought upscale grocer Harris Teeter in July, picking up its first store in Florida since pulling out in 1988. It also competes directly with Publix in the Atlanta area–and soon will be with its slew of locations in North Carolina, which Publix plans to enter next year. German discount retailer Aldi has also moved into Florida.

Yet Crenshaw remains unfazed–he has faith in his employees and his complex compensation system that, in addition to ubiquitous ownership, grants shares of a store-specific bonus pool every 13 weeks. The exact amount varies, but typically 20% of quarterly profits go into that larger pool; 20% of the pool is then paid out in cash to the store’s employees. “When competition opens up across the street and our sales are impacted, they’re impacted,” he says. “So they’re incented to make sure they’re doing everything they can to serve that customer to the best of their ability.”

“” loaded=”1″ style=”box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: bottom;”>

THE TRADITION OF employee ownership dates back to Crenshaw’s grandfather, whose office at Publix’s old headquarters is being restored to its wood-paneled 1960s glory for historical tours. (“It’s our Graceland,” says one assistant store manager.) As the story goes, George Jenkins had been the manager of a successful Piggly Wiggly market in Winter Haven, Fla. but quit at the start of the Great Depression when the new corporate owner, based in Atlanta, refused to grant even five minutes of face time despite Jenkins’ driving eight hours to see him. While forced to wait outside the office, Jenkins supposedly overheard his new boss talking about golf, so he resolved to quit and start a rival store in Winter Haven. From the outset he gave shares in the company to early employees in an effort to win their loyalty.

Jenkins’ big gamble came a decade later. He closed his two stores, borrowed against an orange grove he owned and opened a state-of-the-art supermarket with then new amenities like air-conditioning, wide aisles, automatic doors, fluorescent lighting and a water fountain. People mocked him for pouring money into unnecessary details. But customers loved the in-store comforts, especially the relief from the sweltering Florida sun, and thanked him by spending more on average than they had previously.

One of Publix’s new billboards.

When Mr. George, as he was known, stepped down in 1989 after 59 years, the company had a stellar reputation and $5.3 billion in sales from 367 stores, all in Florida.

His departure led to some soul-searching and ushered in a new, hypercompetitive Publix. By then Wal-Mart was already beginning its advance into the grocery business. Jenkins’ son Howard, who took over as CEO, knew that he had to plot an ambitious course to survive. “We knew how Wal-Mart was getting special deals from manufacturers, and in order to compete we had to increase our buying power,” he says. That meant bulking up and venturing outside the state for the first time ever. He vowed to quintuple sales to $25 billion. One of the first targets was the Atlanta area, which Publix infiltrated in 1991 (led by Crenshaw as vice president).

While there were doubters who felt the local Florida chain would not be able to compete with mature national players, Publix had a plan: Overwhelm new customers with a full-service experience. Publix stores at the time had an average of 250 employees, but those early Atlanta locations hired 400. An incredulous newspaper reporter at an Atlanta store opening in March 1993 joked that, from greeters at the door to helpers in the aisle and baggers pushing customer carts out to the parking lot, it seemed like all 400 were working at the same time. Today the company operates 318 stores across Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee, just under 30% of its total stores.

Meanwhile, it ably defended its home turf. In 2005 Publix’s longtime competitor Winn-Dixie filed Chapter 11, pressured by Publix from the higher-end and discount retailers at the bottom (it has since reorganized and still operates about 480 stores in the South). Albertsons has pulled out of all but four Florida locations.

Even as Publix’s same-store sales increased only 2.7% on average over the last ten years, the company has aggressively worked to boost its industry-leading margins. In 2007 Publix launched a prescription-drug program for customers that now offers free 14-day supplies of six generic antibiotics and 30-day supplies for hypertension and diabetes medicine. The loss leader has helped the pharmacy (now in almost 90% of Publix’s locations) become the company’s fastest-growing department. Also that year it experimented with a Whole Foods-esque format called GreenWise Market to capture some of the booming business in natural and organic foods. The format didn’t take as a stand-alone store, but the GreenWise organic brand, along with Publix’s private label, is a winner, with higher margins on average and stronger sales, up a combined 6% in 2012 (more than triple overall sales growth). The company’s net profit margins over the past ten years have gone from 3.9% to the gaudy 5.6% figure.

Publix’s newest innovation is its Aprons Cooking School, now in eight supermarkets. Catering to 21st-century parents looking to fit scratch cooking into their lifestyles, the Aprons chefs teach classes such as Grilling Fish 101 and A Vegetarian’s Journey Through India–all using ingredients found in the store, of course. While the chain still lacks the wow factor of the larger upscale produce and prepared-food sections at Whole Foods and Wegmans, Neil Stern, retail analyst at McMillan Doolittle, says Publix delivers “operational wow” instead, leaning hard on clean, well-organized and well-stocked stores run by that exceedingly helpful, motivated staff.
WHILE THIS FORMULA proved too much for Winn-Dixie and Albertsons, Wal-Mart’s encroachment is a far greater challenge. Arkansas’ retail giant has become the nation’s largest supermarket chain, with 3,500 stores, including Supercenters and Neighborhood Markets, which extend the Wal-Mart brand of cost-cutting to grocery items. Wal-Mart’s current store total in Florida is merely a beachhead.

To flex its muscles in markets currently dominated by Publix, Wal-Mart last year began airing commercials that depict local moms shaving dollars off their grocery bill by shopping at Wal-Mart. A concurrent newspaper campaign puts receipts from the two stores side-by-side, with one ad in Miami displaying a 16% savings over Publix. Wal-Mart claims the ads are driving a 1% increase in a combined metric of foot traffic and sales. “We’re not surprised that the competition doesn’t like it when we tell customers to compare prices and see for themselves, but we think consumers deserve every chance to find value,” a Wal-Mart spokesman says of the ad campaign, which has infuriated Publix executives. “We won’t apologize for offering low prices or telling customers to compare prices for themselves.”

True to its history, Publix is countering with its own head-to-head marketing blitz, touting a buy one, get one free program available on at least 40 items a week that allows it to discount without eviscerating any product’s core price. “People say you shouldn’t poke the bear,” Jones says. “I say, ‘Why not? Let’s poke the bear.’ ”

Still, Publix is realistic about the comparison. “
You can’t have the lowest price and do what we do,” says Crenshaw. “So we don’t tell our customers that we have the lowest price. What we do is say, ‘Wal-Mart doesn’t always have the lowest price.’ Shop with us and we’ll show you value on your entire basket. Some items will be lower in price, but in addition to that you’re going to get trained, knowledgeable people that care about you as a customer in a clean, safe environment.”

It’s a fine distinction to rest an advertising campaign on but also a unique value proposition: In an age when Amazon’s fast shipping counts as great customer service, Publix wants you to pay for a personal touch in your supermarket. In return it’ll do its best to keep prices competitive and funnel your spending back to the employees who do all the work.

Based on recent results–sales were up 6% in the last quarter and net earnings rose 15%–that people-first formula Publix inherited from George Jenkins is working. Not that Crenshaw is surprised. “Too many companies are subjected to the stock market and analyst calls, and it’s all about what we can do to make sure this quarter we’re projecting this and meeting this,” he says. “We’re in this business for the long haul–83 years so far.”

image

Laoch6

El asesino de Walmart: ¿Cómo de Publix está ganando la guerra en tiendas de comestibles

Por Brian Solomon
http://www.forbes.com/sites/briansolomon/

Publix, empresa formada por familiares es a la vez la mayor empresa propiedad/empleados y el minorista más rentable en América. Esos dos hechos están vinculados, y que podría ser la fórmula para defenderse del gigante minorista de Bentonville.

Pasando a través de las puertas de Publix para escapar del calor abrasador en Lakeland , Florida se siente alivio , pero no es sólo el aire acondicionado que se recibe al entrar. Al caminar por los pasillos , los empleados y oficinistas en camisas – verde salvia y delantales negros te hacen preguntas : ” ¿Cómo estás hoy? ¿Podemos ayudarte con cualquier cosa ? ”

Cuando una mujer de edad mediana le pregunta sobre una caja de galletas, no se escucha un número de pasillo, en cambio, el empleado se encomienda en buscar el artículo, asi como está adiestrado para hacerlo . A la salida, los clientes se mueven al frente rápidamente , gracias a un gol de dos clientes por línea impuesto por un programa computarizado de personal predictivo patentado. Empacadores , una práctica  olvidada en la mayoría de las grandes cadenas de supermercados , llevan las compras de los clientes al estacionamiento . Incluso el presidente de Publix , Todd Jones, que comenzó como empaquetador hace 33 años , se inclina para recoger partículas de basura en el suelo de la tienda.

“Creemos que hay tres formas para diferenciarnos : servicio, calidad y precio”, dice Jones . “Tienes que ser bueno en dos de ellos, y el mejor en uno . Hacemos servicio al cliente nuestro número uno, después la calidad y precio ” .

El lema de las tiendas Wal – Mart: ” Siempre precios bajos “, que ha invadido recientemente el propio terreno de Publix en la Florida , es una sutil. La réplica más directa llega a través de los números. Como mejor se puede describir es: Publix es la cadena más rentable de comestibles en la nación : sus márgenes netos , un 5,6% en 2012 , derrotó ( 3,8 % ) de Wal – Mart , así como las de todos los competidores del público , que van desde el mercado de masas Kroger ( 1,6 % ) hasta los  Whole Foods ( 3,9 % ) .

Otro factor es que en un campo notorio de minoristas Publix , la séptima mayor compañía privada en los EE.UU. ( $ 27.5 mil millones en ventas ) y uno de los menos entendidos gracias a décadas publicaciones incompletas por los medios de comunicación, es también la mayor empresa propiedad/empleados en Estados Unidos. Por 83 años Publix ha prosperado mediante la entrega de un servicio de primer nivel a sus compradores, posisionando a miles de sus cajeros, empacadores , carniceros y panaderos en  mayores accionistas colectivos de la empresa.
Todos los miembros del personal que han puesto 1.000 horas de trabajo y un año de empleo reciben un adicional de 8,5 % de su salario total en las acciones de Publix. (Aunque privada , la Junta establece el precio de las acciones cada trimestre sobre la base de una valoración independiente, está vinculado a $ 26.90 ahora , casi un 20 % ya este año . ) ¿Cuanta ganancia pueden los empleados obtener? Según Publix , un gerente de tienda que ha trabajado en la compañía durante 20 años y gana entre $ 100.000 y $ 130.000 tiene probabilidades de obtener
$300.000 en acciones y ha recibido otros $30.000 en dividendos.

La ruta de esa manera de pago es completamente transparente. Publix se promueve casi exclusivamente desde el interior, y todas las tiendas muestran gráficos de progreso que describen el camino que cada empleado puede tomar para convertirse en un gerente. Cincuenta y ocho mil de los 159.000 empleados de la compañía han registrado oficialmente su interés en el progreso. Se anima a los Asociados para girar a través de varias divisiones, desde la tienda de comestibles con propiedades inmobiliarias a la distribución, para tener una idea amplia de la empresa. Un ex decorador bizcochos en el área de panadería  de la tienda está ahora a cargo de toda la estrategias de ese departamento .Un gerente de distribución encargado de supervisar 800 asociados consiguió su oportunidad cuando descargaba mercancía de los vagones. El gerente de la tienda en Lakeland, Edd Dean comenzó empacando comestibles como adolescente, él nunca esperaba que todavía se encontraría en un supermercado 30 años más tarde. “Cuando me gradué de la universidad llevaba siete años en Publix, y empecé la búsqueda de un ‘trabajo real'”, dice. “Me entrevisté en una gran cantidad de empresas, pero el gerente con quien estaba trabajando me decía constantemente que fuera a Publix. Con el tiempo entré en razón “. Dean es uno de los 34.000 empleados que tienen más de diez años de permanencia.

“Siempre me sorprende que más empresas no reconocen el poder de la propiedad/asociado” dice el CEO de Publix Ed Crenshaw , de 62 años , el nieto del fundador George Jenkins y el cuarto miembro de la familia para dirigir la compañía . Mientras Crenshaw tiene una participación de 1,1% en Publix , por valor de
$230 millones, y toda su familia tiene un 20% , vale $ 4200 millones , los empleados (y ex-empleados ) son los accionistas de control , con una participación del 80 % , con un valor $16,6 mil millones . No es sorprendente que ninguno de ellos pertenece a un sindicato.

Publix ha desarrollado efectivamente una imposición positiva en el lucrativo mercado de la Florida , donde sus 755 tiendas (de un total de 1.073 en total) más del doble que cualquiera de sus rivales . “Se han cubierto el estado tan a fondo que ha hecho difícil para alguien más hacer incursiones “, dice Mark Hamstra , editor de Supermarket News.

Eso está cambiando ahora . El formidable WalMart está apuntando a Florida después de haber saturado cualquier otro mercado en el Sur ; ahora tiene 239 lugares de tiendas de consumibles en el estado. Kroger , el segundo minorista más grande del país, con $ 97 mil millones en ventas, compró el minorista Harris Teeter en julio , recogiendo su primera tienda en la Florida desde que se retiró en 1988. También compite directamente con Publix en el área de Atlanta y pronto lo hará al estar con su gran cantidad de lugares en Carolina del Norte, que Publix planea entrar en el próximo año. La minorista de descuento alemana Aldi también se ha trasladado a la Florida.

Sin embargo, Crenshaw permanece imperturbable, tiene fe en sus empleados y su sistema de compensación compleja que , además de la propiedad ubicua , otorga a las acciones un fondo de bonificaciones/tienda específica cada 13 semanas . La cantidad exacta varía , pero por lo general el 20 % de las ganancias trimestrales entran en ese fondo aún  más grande; A continuación, se paga el 20% del fondo  en efectivo a los empleados de la tienda. ” Cuando la competencia se abre en la calle y nuestras ventas se ven afectados , ellos también lo están “, dice . ” Así que están incentivados para asegurarse de que están haciendo todo lo posible para servir a ese cliente a la medida de sus posibilidades ”

LA TRADICIÓN DE propiedad/empleados se remonta al abuelo de Crenshaw , con domicilio en la antigua sede de Publix está siendo restaurado con sus paneles de madera que lo hicieron glorioso en 1960 para crear recorridos históricos . ( “Es nuestra más preciada tienda “, dice un asistente de gerente de la tienda . ) Según la historia , George Jenkins había sido el gerente de un exitoso mercado de Piggly Wiggly en Winter Haven, Fla . , pero dejó de serlo en el inicio de la Gran Depresión, cuando el propietario de la nueva empresa, con sede en Atlanta , se negó a conceder ni cinco minutos de tiempo para conversar a pesar de Jenkins había conducido ocho horas para verlo. Mientras lo obligaron a esperar fuera de la oficina , Jenkins supuestamente escuchó a su nuevo jefe hablar de golf, por lo que se decidió dejar la compañía y comenzar una tienda rival en Winter Haven . Desde el principio dio acciones de la empresa a los empleados en un esfuerzo para ganar su lealtad.

La gran apuesta de Jenkins llegó una década después. Cerró sus dos tiendas , tomó prestado de un campo de naranjos de su propiedad y abrió un supermercado con nuevas instalaciones tales como aire acondicionado , amplios pasillos , puertas automáticas, iluminación fluorescente y una fuente de agua . Las personas se burlaban de él para verter dinero en detalles innecesarios . Pero a los clientes les encantó las comodidades en las tiendas , especialmente el alivio del sol sofocante de la Florida , y le dieron las gracias.

Cuando el señor George , como se le conocía , dejó el cargo en 1989 después de 59 años , la compañía tenía una reputación estelar y $ 5.3 mil millones en ventas de 367 tiendas, todo en la Florida.

Su salida llevó a un examen de conciencia y marcó el comienzo de una nueva , Publix hipercompetitivo . Para entonces Wal – Mart ya comenzaba su avance en el negocio de comestibles. Howard hijo de Jenkin, quien asumió el cargo de director general , sabía que tenía que trazar un curso ambicioso para sobrevivir. Sabíamos cómo Wal – Mart estaba recibiendo ofertas especiales de los fabricantes, y con el fin de competir tuvimos que aumentar nuestro poder de compra “, dice . Eso significaba adquirir más volumen y aventurarse fuera del estado por primera vez en la historia . Se comprometió a quintuplicar las ventas a $ 25 mil millones. Uno de los primeros objetivos fue el área de Atlanta , que Publix infiltró en 1991 (dirigida por Crenshaw como vicepresidente ) .

Si bien hubo escépticos que consideraban que la cadena local de Florida no sería capaz de competir con jugadores nacionales maduros , Publix tenía un plan : Abrumar nuevos clientes con una experiencia de servicio completo. Tiendas Publix en el momento tenían un promedio de 250 empleados , pero las tiendas primeras en Atlanta contrataron 400. Un periodista incrédulo ante una apertura de la tienda de Atlanta en Marzo del 1993 bromeó diciendo que , los recibidores en la puerta a los ayudantes en el pasillo y empacadores que empujan carritos de clientes al estacionamiento , parecía que los 400 empleados estaban trabajando al mismo tiempo. Hoy en día la compañía opera 318 tiendas en toda Georgia, Alabama, Carolina del Sur y Tennessee , poco menos de 30 % del total de sus tiendas.

Mientras tanto, defendió hábilmente su propio terreno . En 2005 el competidor de mucho tiempo de Publix, Winn-Dixie presentó el capítulo 11 , presionado por Publix de la más alta gama y tiendas de descuento en la parte inferior ( que desde entonces ha reorganizado y todavía opera cerca de 480 tiendas en el Sur) . Albertsons se ha retirado de todos menos cuatro lugares de la Florida.

A pesar de que las ventas de las tiendas de Publix aumentaron sólo un 2,7 % en los últimos diez años , la compañía ha trabajado agresivamente para aumentar sus márgenes de líderes en la industria . En 2007 Publix lanzó un programa de prescripción de medicamentos para los clientes que ahora ofrece suministros gratuitos de 14 días de seis antibióticos genéricos y suministros de 30 días para la hipertensión y medicamentos para la diabetes . El líder de pérdida ha ayudado a la farmacia (en la actualidad en casi el 90 % de las ubicaciones de Publix ) se convierten en el departamento de más rápido crecimiento de la compañíia.
También ese año se experimentó con un formato de Whole Foods llamada Greenwise, para capturar algo del negocio en auge en los alimentos naturales y orgánicos. El formato no lo tomó como una tienda independiente , pero la marca orgánica Greenwise , junto con la marca de distribuidor de Publix , es un ganador , con márgenes más altos en promedio de ventas y más fuertes , hasta un total combinado de 6 % en 2012 ( más del triple en general crecimiento de las ventas). Los márgenes de beneficio neto de la compañía en los últimos diez años han pasado de 3,9 % a la cifra llamativa 5,6 % .

La más reciente innovación de Publix es su Escuela de Cocina , ahora en ocho supermercados . El abastecimiento a los padres del siglo 21 que buscan adaptarse a cero cocinar en sus estilos de vida , los chefs enseñan clases como asar pescado y el viaje de un vegetariano a través de la India y todos los que utilizan ingredientes que se encuentran en la tienda , por supuesto. Mientras que la cadena aún carece el factor sorpresa de los productos de lujo más grande y secciones de comida preparada en Whole Foods y Wegmans , Neil Stern, analista de retail en McMillan Doolittle , dice Publix ofrece “operativo sorpresa” en cambio, se inclina duro, limpio, bien organizado y tiendas administradas por un personal altamente motivado.

MIENTRAS ESTA FORMULA demostró mucho para Winn- Dixie y Albertsons , la invasión de Wal – Mart es un desafío mucho mayor. El gigante minorista de Arkansas  se ha convertido en la cadena de supermercados más grande del país , con 3.500 tiendas , incluyendo Supercenters y Neighborhood Markets , que se extienden  en el protocolo de reducción de costos de artículos de alimentación.

Para demostrar su fuerza en los mercados actualmente dominadas por Publix , Wal – Mart el año pasado comenzó a transmitir los comerciales que representan a las madres locales ahorrándose  dólares de su factura de supermercado por las compras en Wal – Mart . Una campaña de prensa simultánea pone recibos de las dos tiendas de lado a lado , con un anuncio en Miami presentan un 16 % de ahorro sobre Publix . Wal – Mart afirma que los anuncios están impulsando un aumento del 1 % en una métrica combinada de tráfico peatonal y las ventas. ” No nos sorprende que la competencia no le gusta cuando le decimos a los clientes para comparar precios y ver por sí mismos , pero creemos que los consumidores merecen todas las oportunidades para encontrar el valor , ” dijo un portavoz de Wal – Mart, de la campaña publicitaria , que ha enfurecido a los ejecutivos de Publix . “No vamos a pedir disculpas por ofrecer precios bajos o decirle a los clientes a comparar precios por sí mismos”.

Fiel a su historia, Publix está contrarrestando con su propia campaña de marketing de cabeza a cabeza , haciendo alarde de un compre uno , llévese un programa gratuito disponible en al menos 40 artículos a la semana que le permite descontar sin eviscerar precios subyacente de cualquier producto. “La gente dice que no debes metertete con el oso”, dice Jones . ” Yo digo , ‘ ¿Por qué no ? Vamos a mternos con el oso. ‘ ”

Aún así, Publix es realista acerca de la comparación. ”

No se puede tener el precio más bajo y de hacer lo que hacemos ” , dice Crenshaw . ” Así que no le decinos a nuestros clientes que tenemos el precio más bajo. Lo que hacemos es decir, ” Wal – Mart no siempre tiene el precio más bajo”. Compre en nuestras tiendas y vamos a demostrarle la calidad del producto que tiene en su cesta . Algunos artículos serán más bajos en precio, pero “además de que usted va a recibir un servicio de primera, con empleados entrenados y con conocimientos que se preocupan por usted como cliente en un entorno limpio y seguro, estarán más satisfechos.

Es una sutil distinción para descansar una campaña de publicidad pero también una propuesta de valor única : En una época en que el envío rápido de Amazon cuenta como un gran servicio al cliente , Publix quiere que usted page por un toque personal en su supermercado . A cambio que va a hacer todo lo posible para mantener los precios competitivos y canalizar sus gastos de regreso a los empleados que hacen todo el trabajo .

En base a los últimos resultados en ventas subieron un 6 % en el último trimestre y las ganancias netas crecieron un 15 % es una fórmula que se heredó en los primeros  Publix donde  George Jenkins está trabajando . No es que Crenshaw se sorprendió. ” Demasiadas empresas se someten a las del mercado de valores y llamados analistas , y es todo acerca de lo que podemos hacer para asegurarse de que este trimestre estamos proyectando esto y encuentro esto”, dice . “Estamos en este negocio para el largo plazo -83 años hasta ahora. ”

image

Laoch6